Wednesday, March 16, 2016

Wheat is Found in a Ohio Burial Mound, 2000 Year Prior to Being Introduced by Europeans

Wheat is Found in a Ohio Burial Mound, 2000 Year Prior to Being Introduced by Europeans


The origin of the Wheat found in the Ohio burial mound must have its origins in the ancient Middle East and is more evidence that the accounted giants in the Bible, known as the Amorites were the builders of the Ohio mounds.

From an interesting account of certain mounds in Utah, communicated by Mr. Amasa Potter to the Eureka Sentinel, of Nevada, as copied by The Western Review of Science and Industry, I make the following extracts : " The mounds are situated on what is known as the Payson Farm, and are six in number, covering about twenty acres of ground. They are from ten to eighteen feet in height, and from 500 to 1,000 feet in circumference." "Tho explorations divulged no hidden treasure so far, but have proved to us that" there once undoubtedly existed here a more enlighteued race of human beings than that of the Indian who inhabited this country, and whose records have been traced back hundreds of years." " While engaged in excavating one of the larger mounds, wediscovered the feet of a large skeleton, and carefully removing the hard ened earth in which it was embedded, we succeeded in unearthing a large skeleton without injury. The human framework measured six feet, six inches in length, and from appearances it was undoubtedly that of a male. In the right hand was a large iron or steel weapon, which had been buried with the body, but which crumbled to pieces on handling. Near the skeleton we also found pieces of cedar wood, cut in various fantastic shapes, and in a state of perfect preservation ; the carving showing that the people of this unknown race were acquainted with the use of edged tools. We also found a large stone pipe, the stem of which was inserted between the teeth of the skeleton. The bowl of the pipe weighs five ounces, and is made of sandstone ; and the aperture for tobacco had the appearance of having been drilled out." "We found another skeleton near that of the above mentioned, which was not quite as large, and must be that of a woman. There was a neatly carved tombstone near the head of this skeleton. Close by, the floor was covered with a hard cement, to all appearances a part of the solid rock, which, after patient labor and exhaustive work, we succeeded in penetrating, and found it was but the corner of a box, similarly constructed, in which we found about three pints of wheat kernels, most of which was dissolved when brought in contact with the air. A few of the kernels found in the center of the heap looked bright, and retained their freshness on being exposed. These were carefully preserved, and last spring planted and grew nicely. We raised four and a half pounds of heads from these grains. The wheat is unlike any other raised in this country, and pro duces a large yield. It is the club variety ; the heads are very long and hold very large grains."