Friday, October 14, 2016

Remains of an Adena Henge Complex Discovered in Dublin, Ohio


 Remains of an Adena Henge Complex Discovered in Dublin, Ohio


   Within the city limits of Dublin, Ohio near Columbus is a 2500 year old Adena henge complex that is still visible in a residential yard.  Despite the age of these antiquities the Ohio Historical Society places little value in this history, with many of the burial mounds not preserved nor even recognized as historical sites.  



Adena Henge complex located in Dublin, Ohio.  The Ohio Historical Society decided to ignore this site and let it continue to be farmed, thus sealing its fate to forever be erased from the landscape. From "The Nephilim Chronicles: A Travel Guide to the Ancient Ruins in the Ohio Valley."




History of the City of Columbus, 1892 

 In William's History of Franklin and Pickaway Counties is a description of some remains of earthworks which occur near Dublin in this county. As these works exist in a much damaged state, the observations made a good many years ago are valuable and here quoted."On the banks of the Scioto River, in Perry Township, the Williams History says, "are remains of ancient works which have the appearance of fortification and were undoubtedly used as such by some earlier inhabitants of this county, of whom all trace, further than these forts and mounds, is lost. On the farm of Joseph Ferris, a mile north of Dublin Bridge, are to be seen in a good state of preservation, the outlines and embankments of three forts. One of these is within a few feet of his house and is perhaps eighty feet in diameter inside, with an entrance at the east side. The ditch and embankment are well defined. A short distance northeast of this spot, and within arrow shot of it, is a large fort in square form, and enclosing nearly, or quite, half an acre of ground. Although the tramping of cattle for many years has worn down the embankments, they are several feet high and the ditch, which is inside the works, is now some six feet deep. When the country was first settled this ditch was filled with water, and was a bed of mire, a pole thrust into the ground to a depth of ten feet finding no solid ground beneath. This would tend to show that originally this was a strong place and that the ditch was quite deep. Time has filled it with dead leaves, and refuse matter has assisted in obliterating this work. It is situated on a hill that commands a wide view of the country for a considerable distance in either direction. At a little lower point, and nearer the river, is a small mound. There was also a small mound in the center of the larger fort, which was opened many years since, and was found to contain the bones of a large man. These crumbled in pieces soon after being exposed to the air. It is possible that by uncovering the ditch of this fort, some relics of the extinct race that built these works might be obtained. A search of this kind has generally been turned to the mound, instead of the inner ditches of the fort, where probably was the habitation of the builders. A short distance from this larger fort is a smaller one than that first described. There have been several old works of this kind along the banks of the river between these works and Columbus, but they are mostly obliterated by the cultivation of the land on which they stood."See all of the burial mounds in Ohio Here

Part of the outer wall and ditch and gateway of the northwestern henge can still be seen in this yard.  The gateway is aligned to the Equinox sunrise.  In the adjoining field, the larger square henge can be seen as a slight undulation in the field.  As long as Ohio depends on the Ohio Historical Society to maintain and preserve their antiquities they will slowly be erased form the landscape.  Photograph from "The Nephilim Chronicles: A Travel Guide to the Ancient Ruins in the Ohio Valley."


The best Travel Guide to the mounds and earthworks in Ohio. Get direction to the burial mounds and earthworks around Columbus, Ohio here